MIND THE GAP; IN THIS CASE THE “NOTIFICATION GAP”

There has been no shortage of topics to discuss with you since my last MazzInt Blog in August, but I have been diverted by a household move sandwiched between trips to St Louis and Tampa.  We could revisit any number of topics that have been in the news since August such as President Trump’s trip to Asia, the deployment of three carrier strike groups to the Sea of Japan, impactful elections in both Japan and Germany, the Russian uranium deal, or developments in the Mueller investigation.

However what is on my mind right now is an AP article (thttps://wtop.com/government/2017/11/fbi-didnt-tell-us-targets-as-russian-hackers-hunted-emails-2/ ) that appeared over the Thanksgiving Holiday weekend regarding Russian Fancy Bear hackers targeting the personal gmail accounts of individuals with Top Secret security clearances.  This article is on my mind because the reporter who wrote the story told me before it appeared that I was one of Fancy Bear’s targets. Here’s what happened.

I was busy unpacking moving boxes on Friday morning 17 November when I got a call from the United Kingdom. The caller identified himself as Raphael Satter ((https://www.linkedin.com/in/raphaelsatter/) with the Associated Press (AP) and before I could ask why he was calling, he asked if I was Joseph Mazzafro and if my email address was mazzafro@gmail.com?  Since my email is widely known I confirmed who I was and that the email address he referenced was mine.  The reporter than asked me if I was aware of who Fancy Bear was, to which I responded affirmatively. He then asked me if I was aware that Fancy Bear had attempted to hack my gmail account in February 2015.  I said no, but because of my close association with the national security community over many years, I operate on the presumption that my emails are regularly being read by those they are not addressed to.

At this point I am asking myself – – – – what is this reporter looking for?  He then asked me if anyone from Google/gmail or the FBI had informed about me this attempted hack of my gmail account.  I said without hesitation that this call was the first report of any effort to hack my email that I have received. Mr. Satter then went on to explain that the private cyber security firm Secureworks (https://www.secureworks.com/) had developed a list gmail accounts Fancy Bear had tried to penetrate.  He mentioned some of the names which I immediately recognized as now retired leaders of U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) agencies.  Satter said he had spoken to some of them and like me they had not been notified by Google/Gmail or any government counterintelligence (CI) agency about Fancy Bear targeting their gmail accounts.  He then asked me how I felt about hearing this for the first time from an AP reporter to which I responded “No one has ever said to me ‘hey Joe you’ve been targeted by this Russian group.’” I continued “that our own security services have not gone out an alerted me, that’s what I find disconcerting as a national security professional.”   I then explained to Raphael Satter that I was not surprised that the FBI had not notified me because the hack was unsuccessful or they didn’t want to compromise sources and methods  From there the call ended pleasantly.

Dec Mazz Blog

Upon the call’s termination I realized immediately that this was something I should report to DIA as they held my clearance when this Fancy Bear attempted hack occurred.  I called a well-placed individual at DIA for advice and contact information on who I should report this interview from AP to.  When this person got back to me later on 17 November I was advised this was a CI verses a security issue but because I was no longer “affiliated” with DIA the DIA CI office did not have the authority to talk to me about Russian Fancy Bear efforts to hack my gmail or that I learned about it from AP reporter calling in London.  Apparently only the FBI can talk to me about this matter.  In the 10 days between Satter’s phone call to me and his story being run on the AP wire I expressed my concerns indirectly to DIA CI (remember they said they can’t talk to me) that nobody from the government had contacted me and I was concerned that when the story went public I would be seen as not having reported what happened in a timely manner.  I am still waiting to hear from somebody in the government regarding what an AP reporter told me about Fancy Bear attempting to hack gmail accounts of people who have had access to Top Secret Information.

Those who know me won’t be surprised that I have given what has happened (and not happened) to me considerable thought since this 17 November “cold call.”

I am certainly discouraged and confused that no one from the IC has responded to my effort to inform them that a reporter contacted me regarding Fancy Bear hacking attempts against people with known IC connections. I wanted the IC to be ahead of this story before it showed up in the media.  If Secureworks could uncover this Fancy Bear targeting campaign I would like to think that NSA and the FBI were already aware of it, raising the question of the government’s duty to warn American citizens of malicious foreign cyber intrusion attempts.  I am certain that because of the security clearances I have held I have an obligation to report to the government in a timely manner any threats to national security that I become aware of, but apparently when the threat is directed at me the government has no obligation to warn me.  It is not lost on me that one of the reasons those targeted by Fancy Bear didn’t get any notification from the FBI or other parts of the IC is so this hacking effort could be observed and followed, which could put my data and the data others who have served our nations faithfully at risk.  What is not clear to me is whether Google/Gmail was warned by the FBI or DHS about this Fancy Bear hacking effort apparently aimed at those associated with national security so these accounts could be protected.

What I am describing here is a microcosm of the debate that has been gridlocking an effective cyber defense of the United States for at least the past five years.  What is the appropriate quid pro quo for the private sector sharing cyber related activity it observes/encounters with the government in exchange for the government providing meaningful cyber threat information to the private sector?  This story about failure to notify individuals subjected to Fancy Bear Hacking of their gmail accounts will not increase the trust of most Americans that their government is prepared to warn them, if not actually protect them, when they are threatened by a foreign hacking campaign.

That’s what I think; what do you think?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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